Good Old Days on The Farm

There was a day when almost everyone was close to the land. Providing food, clothing, fuel and shelter was not a trip to the local market. Providing meant the family was doing the chores, plowing, planting, hoeing, harvesting, butchering, cutting wood, tapping trees, spinning wool, weaving and separating cream to name just a few.Getting to know an old goat, playing with the lambs, feeding goat kids and piglets; seeing an egg layed, hearing the guinea fowl, turkeys, peafowl and donkys, watching chicks hatch, throwing corn to the ducks, geese and chickens, being licked by a calf, smelling the new-mown hay and countless other experiences at The Farm provide insight into old fashioned farm life and the “Good Old Days.”

Walking among the countless tools, implements and utensils provides insight into the fact that hard physical labor and the development of personal skills are a basic fabric of rural American life.

Seeing the Model T. Ford, antique tractors, wincharger, stone boat, windmill, wood range and wood stave silo develops appreciation for the resourcefulness and ingenuity of our forefathers.

Old Tracto
The Farm is the reason we come to Door County. My father and I really enjoy the old farm equipment and antiques.”
Jon, age: 40
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